Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Voter Apathy

Voter Apathy VOTER APATHY The main fault in elections today is voter apathy, or the choice a registered voter makes to not participate in the voting process of an election. The low voter turnout is a result of many different reasons. Some voters have little or no interest in the election, others feel their vote will not make a difference either way, and don't bother to take the time to vote. And yet, other voters choose not to vote because of a lack of good candidates to choose from.The voter turn out has become so low, there are more people not voting then people who do vote. In the 1996 presidential election, 51% of registered voters did not vote, and that value has only become worse with the time that has passed. Only 38% of eligible voters participated in the mid-term elections in 1998.It is debatable if the candidates are the ones at fault for this.Polish_parliamentary_election_2007_voter_turnout -...Some candidates spend too much time with negative campaigning, trying to make the opponent l ook bad, and worrying about media coverage, then to give a detailed opinion about a position.... what really counts. This leaves voters uneducated about the candidates and unsure which candidate would be best to support with their vote.In our society, people are more likely to vote in an election if they actively dislike one of the candidates running. The candidate is seen as a threat to them, and provides a motivation for registered voters to go to the polls and vote. People who like both candidates, even if they like one significantly more than the other, are not as likely to vote as those who like one and dislike the other. These impressions about a candidate can be influenced by neighbors, family members, and co-workers. If a person's family,

Saturday, November 23, 2019

Free Essays on The Saccheri Quadrilateral

The Saccheri Quadrilateral Saccheri was a Jesuit priest who lived from 1667 to 1733. Before he passed away he published a book entitled Euclides ab omni nà ¦vo vidicatus. (Euclid Freed of Every Flaw). Saccheri suggested that for a line and a point, there are three possibilities. The first is that there is exactly one line through the point parallel to the given line. The second, there is no line through the point parallel to the given line. The third is more than one line through the point parallel to the given line. Saccheri investigated the summit angles of a quadrilateral; his result depended on the postulate chosen. He tried to find a contradiction to prove that Euclids fifth postulate was true. He assumed the negation of the parallel Postulate and tried to arrive at a contradiction. He studied a family of quadrilateral that have come to be called Saccheri quadrilateral. Saccheri tried to find a contradiction; he started with postulates other than Euclids. He didn’t find one, so he still claimed that Euclids was freed from all defects. Although Saccheri’s work did have on flaw. Many historians praised Saccheri’s book of 39 theorems. The first 70 pages is an ensemble of logic and geometric keenness, which can be called perfect. But all of a sudden Saccheri abruptly turns away from his carefully plotted course. In his 33rd theorem is where his flaw can be found. This is where h he breaks away from his strict logic and carefully crafted perfect work. He remarks â€Å"†¦ but this contrary to our intuitive knowledge of a straight line†. Although Saccheri ends his book by admitting that he had not completely proven the acute case and for the reason is said to have with held publication of the book during his lifetime. Even though his book came to an abrupt conclusion, Saccheri’s investigation was a crucial step in the evolving of non- Eluclidian geometries. His major achievement was to break ground for the later geome... Free Essays on The Saccheri Quadrilateral Free Essays on The Saccheri Quadrilateral The Saccheri Quadrilateral Saccheri was a Jesuit priest who lived from 1667 to 1733. Before he passed away he published a book entitled Euclides ab omni nà ¦vo vidicatus. (Euclid Freed of Every Flaw). Saccheri suggested that for a line and a point, there are three possibilities. The first is that there is exactly one line through the point parallel to the given line. The second, there is no line through the point parallel to the given line. The third is more than one line through the point parallel to the given line. Saccheri investigated the summit angles of a quadrilateral; his result depended on the postulate chosen. He tried to find a contradiction to prove that Euclids fifth postulate was true. He assumed the negation of the parallel Postulate and tried to arrive at a contradiction. He studied a family of quadrilateral that have come to be called Saccheri quadrilateral. Saccheri tried to find a contradiction; he started with postulates other than Euclids. He didn’t find one, so he still claimed that Euclids was freed from all defects. Although Saccheri’s work did have on flaw. Many historians praised Saccheri’s book of 39 theorems. The first 70 pages is an ensemble of logic and geometric keenness, which can be called perfect. But all of a sudden Saccheri abruptly turns away from his carefully plotted course. In his 33rd theorem is where his flaw can be found. This is where h he breaks away from his strict logic and carefully crafted perfect work. He remarks â€Å"†¦ but this contrary to our intuitive knowledge of a straight line†. Although Saccheri ends his book by admitting that he had not completely proven the acute case and for the reason is said to have with held publication of the book during his lifetime. Even though his book came to an abrupt conclusion, Saccheri’s investigation was a crucial step in the evolving of non- Eluclidian geometries. His major achievement was to break ground for the later geome...

Thursday, November 21, 2019

Question Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words - 8

Question - Essay Example When the level of technology is low or out of date, the system level autonomy is limited due to lack of proper requirements while when the level of technology is good, the system level is less limited. This matters a lot. Low level of investment is likely to limit the level of the autonomy of the system-level whereby this will be due to lack of adequate resources while on the other hand if the investment is good the system-level may not be much limited. The surrogate hierarchy of decision making is based on the fact the in the absence of the competent advanced directives, decision still have to be made. In this case the surrogate hierarchy comes into play. The hierarchy of the surrogate decision making is therefore as follows: In case it reaches the decision making point when the suffering patient is out of reach the first people to be consulted in this case are the patients spouse with help in the final decision making. State registered domestic partners are also allowed to come in and play this role together with the sibling. This may come in place due to self selection and convenience selection. Self selection occurs when individuals allocate resources for themselves while convenience occur when occur when resources are easy to allocate This principle is composed of all the conditions that the society experiences and the positivity behind those conditions. All community must actively show concern towards improving the health awareness in order to make it a better place. This principle has three essential elements which are social welfare, peace and security and respect for persons. It is in line with the concept of human dignity, common good and human rights. It implies what the society at large can offer to individual person. This principle requires that every person within the society be able to access basic health care services that are necessary. This is a policy which its objective is to educate and create awareness to the

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Summary Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words - 212

Summary - Essay Example As there was progression in time, the farmers thought they were to have a special day away from the working days where they could be able to praise God and prayer take place (Phillips, 98). In the contract and agreement with God, there was need of a special place where there would be honoring the contract and special people that would be needed to administer and carry out the contract. This led to development of religion with coming up with a Sabbath day, a priest and churches. There is also a link that can be given between cave art and religion. In the Paleolithic cave art there is evidence of religion. There was belief by the ancestors that the spirit world existed deep in the dark foreboding caves. Through the caves, the ancestors believed that the supernatural world could be contacted in the caves or these were the places where they could leave the signs that were needed by the spirits (Phillips, 99). According to Jean Clottes, those that lived in the development of art period believed that there was supernatural powers that lined inside the caves and the only way of attempting to contact the spirits was giving respect and contacting the powers in the

Sunday, November 17, 2019

Unsafe practices Essay Example for Free

Unsafe practices Essay 5 people died due to neglect. The main one being a nurse/carer gave the wrong dosage of warfarin to a resident which resulted in the lady being hospitalized and her MAR charts being falsified to hide the mistake, as the carers knew that if the hospital had seen the original MAR charts would have resulted in a CQC inspection and possibly the home being shut down. Nurses would shut door when residents were shouting for help. That resident could have been shouting for any number of reasons but the staff chose to shut the door and not investigate. They put a lady on the toilet and forgot about her, which could have resulted in a serious accident or worse. They also used parcel tape to hold a bandage in place, which when removed could cause skin tears or bruising. The only reason anything came of this is because a carer/nurse left the home and became a whistleblower after she had found 28 separate drug mistakes had been made in one night shift and she was asked to shred the MAR charts for the wafarin incident. 2010-2012 People with learning disabilities were left alone for long periods of time even though some of them had a history of self harming. Staffs were found to have been verbally abusing the residents and one male member of staff physically abused a female resident. These people ensure their trust to carers thinking they are going to get the best possible care. The manager should ensure there is enough staff to cover each shift as night shift was found to be understaffed possibly causing safeguarding issue. An audit showed lack of staff training, lack of planning sufficiently for care of older residents, limited access to activities and poor provision of food and drinks. All of this comes under physical abuse and neglect it also isolates them from bonding together due to the lack of activities so the abuse would go unnoticed for longer as the residents weren’t mixing together and building friendships. As for the food and drinks the residents are entitled to choose what they want and when they want it otherwise it falls into the category institutional abuse In all of these incidents the residents have suffered numerous kinds of abuse which isn’t acceptable. If staff were unsure of what to do they should have asked for further training or guidance.

Friday, November 15, 2019

Sewage Treatment Essays -- essays research papers

Sewage Treatment Where does the wastewater go? When water goes down your sink or toilet, it travels through small pipes to much larger trunk sewers. The sewer systems are built to the slope of the ground around the Elbow and Bow Rivers. This slope allows most of the waste to go down by gravity, rather than expensive pumps, to one of four plants. To handle low areas, which do not have enough slope, pumping stations have been made. How is wastewater treated? Wastewater treatment in Calgary involves the following processes: Preliminary treatment: The water flow is slowed down to get the sand, gravel and other materials to settle out into grit tanks. The waste is then strained by bar screens, which remove large solid objects like sticks. All material collected by grit tanks and bar screens is washed and then taken to a landfill. Primary treatment: The screened water flows into settling tanks, allowing more solids to settle to the bottom of the tanks. Also at this stage, "scum" (oils and greases) are scraped off the top of the water. This is pumped to large tanks, for disposal. Secondary treatment: The half treated water then goes by gravity to covered aeration tanks where it is mixed with "activated sludge" which contains aerobic bacteria. The bacteria eat the organic things remaining in the water. In order to provide a good environment for the bacteria to multiply, air is pumped and spread into the water by blowers. The water, air and ...

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

A Doll’s House: The Subordinate Woman

A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen The Subordinate Woman 4/2/2010 DePauw University Mira Yaseen Mira Yaseen Professor Anthony Comm 214 2 April 2010 A Doll House by Henrik Ibsen The Subordinate Woman In the wake of realism, Ibsen came upon us with an outspoken controversial play that encompassed many realities of the conservative Victorian era. Presenting a genuine image of the societal issues at the time, A Doll House gives us an insight to the world of women in the nineteenth century; it tells us about their struggles and realizations. Nora Helmer’s decision to leave her husband and children to educate and explore herself reflects Ibsen’s hope for a reform in women's role in the society. This necessitates a change in the masculine point of view towards women. Nora’s characteristics pertain to the stereotypical image of the subordinate woman. However, Nora's contradictory actions -such as her spendthrift nature and her attempt to buy the ‘cheapest outfits', and her ineffectuality yet her ability to save her husband's life regardless of her methods- shed light on these characteristics and show that they are products of the patriarchal society's superiority and its expectations and misconceptions of women (Jacobus 660, 668). We first meet Nora as she enters her house after a Christmas shopping spree. We are introduced to Torvald and Nora’s relationship; â€Å"is that my little lark twittering out there? he calls on her, â€Å"Is that my squirrel rummaging around† (Jacobus 663). The first noticeable thing about the relationship is Nora’s inferiority to Torvald. As the interaction continues between Nora and Torvald, her childishness becomes evident. Nora wipes her mouth and puts the macaroons away so that Torvald would not know about them. Later on in the play, when Nora and Torvald finally have th e first serious conversation in their marriage, Nora reveals how her father treated her; â€Å"he used to call me his doll-child† she declares. Obviously, Nora has been pampered her whole life, first by her father and now by Torvald, who treats her the same way, as his doll-wife. This doll-like lifestyle prevented Nora’s maturity and amplified her childishness instead. Therefore, her childishness is a result of the way she was brought up and later treated by her husband. As the audience is introduced to Nora's spoiled nature, it is not surprising to find out that she is a spendthrift. However, this view is challenged once we learn more about Nora's seemingly contradictory behavior. She is depicted as a wastrel from the beginning of the play. As Torvald just got a promotion and a raise, Nora urges him to give her more money for Christmas shopping, â€Å"Oh but Torvald, this year we should really let ourselves go a bit† she argues. She even suggests that he take a loan just so that she can let herself ‘go a bit’ (664). Nonetheless, this image is later contested once we find out that Nora found a way to get money to save her husband’s life, regardless of her unorthodox methods of getting the money. Not only did Nora find a way to get the money, but she was also able to make the payments on time by doing some copying to earn money. Furthermore, Nora is also seen as resourceful and money-smart when she mentions buying the ‘simplest cheapest outfits’ for herself (668). In addition, although Nora might have been shown as a squanderer, she is still trying to pay the debt and might have been nagging Torvald for more money to secretly save up for the loan’s payments. This contradiction in Nora’s actions illustrates society’s low expectation of women which reflects on their personalities. If Nora was given a chance from the beginning she could have excelled. She is only after luxury because this is what the society conditions her to be interested in. It is the life style that both her father and her husband provided her with and expected her to embrace. Thus, it became a self-fulfilling prophecy that did not encourage her to change. The initial image of Nora's personality gradually changes throughout the play from a pampered incapable woman to a seemingly witty and resourceful one. However, her unawareness and inexperience in dealing with situations disadvantage her. We see Nora’s capability in the mere fact that she thought of forging her father’s signature to be able to travel to Italy for treatment. Nora remarks that she could not give the trip up, it â€Å"was to save my husband's life† (672). In spite of that, Torvald considers her helpless and clueless; â€Å"But you think I love you any less for now knowing how to handle your affairs? No, no-just lean on me’ I’ll guide you and teach you. I wouldn’t be a man if this feminine helplessness didn’t make you twice as attractive to me† he protests (688). Nora proves her capability, yet, the novelty of taking charge in a situation complicates it. Nora is not aware of the seriousness of a crime like forgery. She goes further to assume that â€Å"somewhere in the books these things are allowed† (672). Moreover, she acts naively when she reveals to Krogstad earlier in that conversation that she did indeed forge her father’s signature, â€Å"I signed Papa’s name† she admits candidly. She reasons that her father could not sign the papers due to his sickness. Nora thinks that her circumstances justify her actions and does not understand the rigidity of law. This example accentuates the fact that the gender inequality and the inferior position occupied by women in the Victorian era, denied them rights and chances that would have made them more knowledgeable and capable. Education, for example was not the same for both sexes. Women's education was focused on teaching skills that would make them better house wives, like embroidery and sewing, while men's education was geared towards preparing them for their future careers, as they were taught law and languages. Work was almost exclusive to men. Nora points that out and expresses that it is a fulfilling experience for women too. She notes that copying â€Å"was wonderful fun, sitting around and working like that, earning money. It was almost like being a man† (668). If we consider Nora and Torvald an average Victorian couple, I assume that if Nora had the same education her husband did she probably would have understood the strictness of the law and the consequences of forgery. A society that did not understand the importance of educating women created a class of ignorant women who could not take action or responsibility for their actions. Torvald and the audience are not the only ones who see Nora as incompetent, Mrs. Linde, a woman, shares this same view. Nora seems to be very selfish and self-centered. After she learns about Mrs. Linde’s dire circumstances after her husband passed away, she starts rambling about her own life and good fortune. â€Å"I don’t want to be selfish, I want to think only of you today† she say and adds that her husband is getting â€Å"a big salary and lots of commissions. Our lives’ll be so different; we’ll be able to do whatever we want. Oh Kristine, I’m so relieved, so happy. To have no more worries, all one needs, isn’t it wonderful? † (666). Like Torvald, Mrs. Linde thinks Nora is inept. She thinks that Nora â€Å"really knows so little of life's burdens†. Nora is aware of the way other people see her and it aggravates her. We see her frustration when she responds to Mrs. Linde: â€Å"You're just like the others; you all think I'm incapable of anything serious† (667). The words ‘the others' and ‘you all' suggest that Nora has been treated this way by almost everyone, starting with her father, later on her husband, and now her female friend as Jacobus points out: â€Å"She is made of much stronger stuff than anyone has given her credit for† (660). This suggests that Nora has been considered inferior and treated as an incapable individual by the whole society. Ibsen makes sure the viewer and reader think of her as incapable too since her behavior at the beginning supports this conception. Nonetheless, this depiction changes when we find out that Nora has gone to great lengths to save her husband’s life. The fact that Mrs. Linde sees Nora as incapable is a very crucial point; it represents the way women viewed their selves and their abilities. They seem to have had low expectations of themselves; they succumbed to the society's conventions like Nora succumbed to her husband's repression. The society's perceptions shaped theirs as well and that is why a transformation of their role in society at that time was needed. All these contradictions in Nora's character imply that Nora did not have the strong will to overcome the limitations set in front of her by the society and her husband, until the crisis pushes her to make a decision, and leave Torvald and her children. The first audience to watch this play found Nora's reaction preposterous. Nora goes on a mission to discover herself, outside of the doll house. She realizes that what she has been living is not the real world, that she cannot be a good person, wife and mother if she does not know herself. This play does not only send a message about women's rights, equality and society, but it stresses the importance of individuality and self-discovery in the first place. The primary duty of anyone is to find out who they truly are (Jacobus 661). This play can be interpreted in a humane context rather than a feminine one. The stereotype of the inferior, naive, and incapable oman appears throughout the play. We see it in Nora's actions, which are contradictory to what we expect at the beginning. This progression reaches its peak when Nora finally decides to leave and sets on a journey of self-discovery. Her departure highlights the importance of and expresses the hope for a reform of the repressed and inferior status of women in the society, which was caused by the suprema cy of men and the patriarchal society. Works Cited Jacobus, Lee A. The Bedford Introduction to Drama. 6th ed. Boston: Bedford/ St. Martin's. Print.

Sunday, November 10, 2019

Tattoos and Their Relationship to Polynesian Culture

â€Å"They print signs on people’s body and call this tattow†- James Cook (Losch, 2003). What might his first thoughts have been upon anchoring at one of the Polynesian islands, seeing natives covered in markings? What did the markings and designs mean? Could he have wondered what the significance was, who did this to them, and what was used to place those markings on them. Although tattoos were ultimately banned, there was an impact on the Polynesian culture; one could determine ones rank, status, and origin based on the tattoos. Tattoos have existed on the Polynesian islands for over 2000 years, Samoa being the oldest island in the Polynesian chain and Aotearoa-slash-Te Waipounamu being the youngest of the islands that practiced tattooing. Although the Spaniards were the first to discover tattoos in Polynesia in 1595, the first written descriptions regarding tattoos did not appear for almost two centuries (Tahiti Tatou, 2007). Though there were differences between the Polynesian islands that made each island unique there were also similarities that were shared between all the islands. One of the primary differences between the tattoos on Polynesian islands was the traditional names that were used for tattooing. For example, many of the islands used traditional names for tattooing such as Moko from the island Maori, Tatatu from the island of Tonga, and Tatau from the island of Samoa. In fact the term tattoo originated from the Polynesian word â€Å"ta† which means to strike something and the Tahitian word â€Å"tatau† which means to mark something (Designbloom, 2000-2009). There were two basic design styles that were shared amongst all the Polynesian islands. The first design style was known as Etua and the second style was known as Enata (Hastings, 2009). The designs associated with Etua were of a strong spiritual nature, had a religious connotation, and were looked upon as magical symbols that would provide protection by the gods. The designs associated with Enata were based on natural designs which could be used to determine a native’s status, role, genealogy, occupation, and identity. The following are some examples of symbols based on Polynesian design and their meanings (Hastings 2009). Shark’s Teeth- Shark’s teeth tattoos are for protection Turtles- A turtle symbol represents long life and fertility Tiki- The god Tiki is often shown with eyes closed. This is because Tiki is able to smell trouble before it is seen. Although Enata and Etua were distinct styles, the patterns and designs used by the various islands, and the tribes of each island were distinct enough to set them apart from one another. The following was noted, â€Å"Within the islands currently known as French Polynesia (the Society, Tuamotu, Austral, Gambier and Marquesas groups), the individual island groups or even individual islands had unique designs. Thus, it was possible to identify a person's origins based on their tattoos† (Losch, 2003). An example of the ability to identify natives based on their island of origin was the spiral motif used by the Maori natives of Aotearoa-slash-Te Waipounamu. Not only was it possible to identify the island of origin it was also possible to determine the status that one held within the tribe. The ritual of receiving a tattoo normally began as one reached teenage years; this was looked upon as a rite of passage into adulthood. Additional tattoos were added over time; the more a man was tattooed the more prestige he had (Opusmang, 2008). Tattoos played an important role in determining how one was looked upon within the tribe, tattoos were associated with wealth, strength, and power. Consequently, it was not uncommon for the chief, and the warriors to have the most detailed, and extensive tattoos. Additionally, Tattoos were so important in the culture that those men, who were completely tattooed, known as to’oata, were admired; however, those men who were not tattooed were despised by their tribe (Tahiti Tatou, 2007). Tattoos on men were far more extensive then on women and included intricate designs. The tattoos on Samoan men’s thighs were so extensive that it almost appeared as though they were clothed. Additionally Samoan men had a tattoo that was referred to as a â€Å"pe’a† which covered their thighs, buttock, lower back, and concluded with a piece around their naval. Unlike the design of the female referred to as â€Å"malu†, which was a lace webbing design, the design of the â€Å"pe’a† was a solid pattern. As opposed to males, the tattoos on females were generally located on the hands, feet, arms, ears, and lips (Tahiti Tatou, 2007). Women of wealth were allowed to have their legs tattooed if they chose to do so. There were additional differences that related to men and women when it came to tattoos. One such difference related to Tahitian women, it was common practice for them to have a deep blue hue on their loins and buttocks. Another common practice occurred when a young girl reached the age of 12, her right hand was tattooed, at which point she was allowed to prepare food, and join in the ritual of rubbing coconut oil on deceased members of the tribe (Tahiti Tatou, 2007). Traditionally males were the most decorated members of the tribe; however this was not the case on Fiji and Tahiti. As a matter of fact it was the exact opposite; the females were required to have tattoos. The first tattoos that a young girl received were marks on the inside of her arms, she was then deemed free of food taboos, and was then allowed accept food from others (Opusmang, 2008). The island of Samoa could very well have ended up with the same tradition as Fiji and Tahiti if not for two Samoan sisters who received their training in Fiji. Upon their return trip from Fiji the Samoan sisters, who were credited with bringing the art and ritual of tattooing to Samoa, somehow managed to reverse the tradition (Losch, 2003). Thus it appears a new tradition was started quite by accident, which resulted in the extensive and intricate tattooing of the male natives on Samoa. This new tradition was adopted by many of the Polynesian islands. Tattooing was considered a ritual that was preceded by a ceremony. The preparation that led up to the ceremony was quite elaborate, a period of cleansing was required; one was expected to fast and abstain from contact with women during this period. The art of tattooing was described by Dr. ROLLIN in this manner: â€Å"The patient was immobilized most frequently in a sort of vise composed of two trunks of banana trees between which he was attached and held tight. The tattooer, accompanied by his assistants, sang a sort of chant of the occasion syncopated to the rhythm of the tapping of his little mallet. Each drop of blood was rapidly wiped up with a scrap of tapa, so that none be allowed to fall to the ground† (Tahiti Tatou, 2007). The ritual was very painful and could go on for several days or weeks. Specific tools and dye were created to perform the ritual act of tattooing. The tools were created out of either bone or tortoise shell. The implement was shaped into a comb with needles on the end, which was attached to a handle. The dye was created from the soot of burnt candlenut which was mixed with water or oil (Tahiti Tatou, 2007). The tool was dipped into the dye; the needles were placed on the person’s body and tapped with a mallet, which transferred the dye. This process was repeated numerous time until either the individual could no longer take the pain or the sun went down. Nevertheless, it was continued the following day, and many days thereafter until the design was complete. Performing the act of tattooing members of one’s tribe was considered a sacred act which was performed by a master or a shaman. In most instances it was the master or shaman that determined the type of design, who would receive the tattoo, and when (Losch, 2003). In fact they were highly trained, aware of the meanings of the designs, and highly proficient in the technical art that was involved. As a result, the master or shaman was held in high esteem by all members of the tribe. The practice of tattooing tribe members went on for many years until the arrival of missionaries in 1797. Soon after their arrival tattooing was banned by the missionaries, it was deemed to go against the Old Testament and was forbidden by Christian churches. Consequently tattooing remained on the fringes of society, in other cases the art of tattooing completely died out, as occurred on the islands of Tonga and Rapanui. As a result many of the original designs were thought to be lost when missionaries banned tattoos after their arrival in the in 1797. Ironically traditional Polynesian tattoo designs are reappearing due to over 400 notes and drawings that were done by a missionary named Karl Von Steinen (Tahiti Tatou, 2007). Prior to the banning of tattoos by missionaries in 1797 tattoos played an important role in the Polynesian culture. Tattoos had a direct impact on tribal hierarchy. In fact it was possible to determine the island of origin and the status one held in the tribe based on the design of the tattoos, the locations of the tattoos, and the number of tattoos that covered the body. There were, in fact, differences between male and female members of the tribe when it came to determining the location of the tattoos, the designs of the tattoos, and the quantity of tattoos. The fact that individuals were willing to endure such pain over many days or even weeks is an indication of how important tattooing was to the Polynesian culture. Try to imagine the pain associated with being tattooed, the only choices available are to proceed with the tattoo or risk being shunned, ostracized, and despised by the tribe.

Friday, November 8, 2019

Free Essays on Glass Menagerie

Coping with Sin The first mention of sin in the bible is mentioned in the fifth chapter of Romans, written by Paul. â€Å"Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned† (Rom. 5:12). According to Paul, humanity was cursed because Adam sinned when he ate from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. Since the creation of Adam, all is guilty of sin. Every living soul will have to face judgment on the second coming of Christ, and not everyone handles sin in the same manner. Lucky for us all we have a loving and forgiving father. A fictional story titled The Minister’s Black Veil was written by Nathaniel Hawthorne and published in the year 1836. Mr. Hawthorne illustrates how a clergyman deals with his guilt of sin. This remarkable story features a main character, Reverend Hooper, who is deemed a mysterious man because he wears a black veil to conceal his sin(s) from others until his death. Reverend Ho oper was a good preacher because his veiled face was of a physical symbol for his parishioners to concentrate on, although he was not overly energetic to help influence his parishioners. Reverend Hooper demonstrates his inability to cope with sin by hiding his face, by not conveying a needed reason for wearing a veil, and by using the veil as a tangible presence to cover his physical fear of others. The first way Reverend Hooper displays his inability to deal with sin is by concealing his face from everyone. The piece of crape that formed the veil was always in place even as he performed his religious duties or regular daily activities of his life. His parishioners thought something must be wrong with Mr. Hooper’s mentality because of the point of view that was created by the people who observed the veil. One example of this is when an elderly woman muttered, â€Å"I don’t like it. He has changed himself into something awful, only by hiding his ... Free Essays on Glass Menagerie Free Essays on Glass Menagerie Broken Glass In the play â€Å"The Glass Menagerie,† one of the central themes is people must grow and change throughout life. Some people change and grow gradually and some people all at once have change for life. Though all the characters in the play do not change and grow. Laura has the most significant and noticeable changes and growth in the play. Tom changes and grows too but it is much more subtle than Laura changes. Though Amanda does not change or grow at all in this play but she sticks with her old southern heritage. Laura makes the most apparent change during the play. She starts out as helpless as a puppy. Amanda says, â€Å"resume your seat, little sister-I want you to stay fresh and pretty-for gentlemen callers† (1,942). Everything is done for her she has no responsibilities at all. â€Å"No, sister, no, sister-you be the lady this time and I’ll be the darky† Amanda says (1,941). Amanda says, â€Å"stay fresh and pretty!-It’s almost time for our gentlemen callers to start arriving†(2,943). Laura is always down on herself she never says a good a thing about herself. Laura says, â€Å"I don’t believe we’re going to receive any†¦ it isn’t a flood, it isn’t a tornado, Mother. I’m just not as popular as you were in Blue Mountain†(2,943). Later Laura goes on to say, â€Å"I’m-crippled†(2,947). She is unsure of herself and is just waiting for something to happen to change this perception she has. That’s when the gentlemen caller Jim is on his way over for dinner. Amanda has worked Laura up so much Laura can’t handle it. Laura says, â€Å"Mother, you’ve made me so nervous†(6,965). Laura really gets fired up when she finds out that the gentlemen caller is Jim, the Jim she had a crush on in high school the only crush she has had in her life. When Laura finally sits down and starts talking with Jim, Laura is changed for life. Jim warms her up by having her sit down next him on the floor. ... Free Essays on Glass Menagerie Coping with Sin The first mention of sin in the bible is mentioned in the fifth chapter of Romans, written by Paul. â€Å"Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned† (Rom. 5:12). According to Paul, humanity was cursed because Adam sinned when he ate from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. Since the creation of Adam, all is guilty of sin. Every living soul will have to face judgment on the second coming of Christ, and not everyone handles sin in the same manner. Lucky for us all we have a loving and forgiving father. A fictional story titled The Minister’s Black Veil was written by Nathaniel Hawthorne and published in the year 1836. Mr. Hawthorne illustrates how a clergyman deals with his guilt of sin. This remarkable story features a main character, Reverend Hooper, who is deemed a mysterious man because he wears a black veil to conceal his sin(s) from others until his death. Reverend Ho oper was a good preacher because his veiled face was of a physical symbol for his parishioners to concentrate on, although he was not overly energetic to help influence his parishioners. Reverend Hooper demonstrates his inability to cope with sin by hiding his face, by not conveying a needed reason for wearing a veil, and by using the veil as a tangible presence to cover his physical fear of others. The first way Reverend Hooper displays his inability to deal with sin is by concealing his face from everyone. The piece of crape that formed the veil was always in place even as he performed his religious duties or regular daily activities of his life. His parishioners thought something must be wrong with Mr. Hooper’s mentality because of the point of view that was created by the people who observed the veil. One example of this is when an elderly woman muttered, â€Å"I don’t like it. He has changed himself into something awful, only by hiding his ... Free Essays on Glass Menagerie The Glass Menagerie The Characters’ Escape From Reality in The Glass Menagerie The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams centers around a dream of escape. Although everyone wants to escape from a different reality, they all feel that need to get away. The father is the most successful in his escape because he never has to deal with anything at home. He actually leaves and doesn’t look back. As for the other four: Laura, Amanda, Tom, and Jim, they seem to be stuck throughout the play. Jim seems to be the only one with a real chance at breaking away from his reality. When Tom breaks free, his memory brings him back to that place. Each person escapes their reality in some way and is somewhat successful at it. Whether through dreams or actually walking away, everyone manages to break free. Tom is, by far, the biggest dreamer. Tom dreams of leaving the â€Å"†¦over crowded urban centers of lower middle-class population† (1267). Tom envies his father who actually had the guts to walk out. Tom expresses this when he tells Amanda, â€Å"†¦Mother, I’d be where [the father] is!† (1277). Tom wants to leave so desperately that he â€Å"†¦paid [his Merchant Marine] dues this month, instead of the light bill† (1295). Tom would rather think of himself and let his mother and sister sit in the dark, alone, than take responsibility for his family. Tom says he is â€Å"†¦tired of the movies† (1294) meaning that he is ready for his own adventures. He â€Å"†¦[retires] to a cabinet of the washroom to work on poems when business [is] slack in the warehouse† (1289) By doing this, Tom is looking for yet another escape from the reality of working at a job he hates. Tom also loathes his mother in some way. This is most evident when Tom calls Amanda an â€Å"†¦ugly –babbling old- witch†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (1278). When Tom does finally escape his realities they continue to haunt him. Every time Tom sees â€Å"†¦a pi ece of transparent glass†¦Ã¢â‚¬  (1310), or hears â€Å"†¦a...

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Diabetes

Diabetes Needs AssessmentIn the United States alone, according to the National Diabetes Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), The Outpatient Database of Indian Health Service (IHS), The U.S. Renal Data System of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the U.S. Census Bureau, shows an estimate of 23.6 million people, with 17.9 million diagnosed, and 5.7 million unaware of the onset of Type 2 Diabetes. (CDC, 2007, p.5)As the United States multicultural increasingly grows, lifestyle has shifted to be less healthy, which leads to obesity and Type 2 Diabetes, a major health issue for many ethic and racial groups. This multicultural group diet, may have consisted of plant-fish, but now the choices are more animal protein, animal fat, and processed carbohydrates. There is more consumption of sweets which contain those process carbohydrates and saturated fat, and less physical activity that is exercised, according to reports from NIH.With the United States becoming more d iversified every year, there is a need for more education in prevention and control of Type 2 Diabetes in all cultures in every state through my Diabetes Prevention Program called, Diabetes Here Now, which is geared to assist any and everyone in nutrition and exercise.Ulcus bei Diabetes à ¼ber dem HalluxYou must assist your body to keep your insulin and glucose in balance Type II is where the body can't make enough or properly use insulin. Diet and an active lifestyle play an important role in controlling this type. Individuals that I personally know can control this with diet and most take pills such as Sulfonylureas stimulate the beta cells of the pancreas to release more insulin.Many experts say that diabetes is genetic. I have even heard people say that it may skip generations. There are many risk factors to consider even if diabetes does not run in your family. These risk factors include excess body weight, having your HDL cholesterol under 35, high blood levels of triglyceri des, high blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, low activity level, poor diet, etc. All in all if you have a family history of...

Sunday, November 3, 2019

Applying a leadership theory to the Qatar Fencing Federation Essay

Applying a leadership theory to the Qatar Fencing Federation - Essay Example Organisational culture is best defined as a set of beliefs and group values which serve as the underpinning for behavioural norms that drive actions of organisational members. Attitudes of employees and managers alike determine the culture of an organisation. When a group has established an organisational culture where all group members share similar sets of convictions, it is easier to create a team-focused organisation. When there is a culture where there is disparity in thinking and values, it can obstruct the achievement of goals and objectives. This is why transformational leadership is the most effective solution for the Federation. With the President, coaches, managers and players all having different personal objectives for what drives their actions, there is no ability to get everyone in the group to begin thinking and behaving along a set of established norms. Cohesive culture development requires routine communications between all group members, regularly remind the group of the organisation’s vision and mission, which in turn creates loyalty and support for the transformational leader. This is the essence of transformational leadership: ensure active participation and consultation among all group members, establish and consistently reiterate a mission and vision for the team, and use inspirational dialogue to motivate others to work cooperatively as a team; rather than just as a group.  The individual within the Qatar Fencing Federation that would be most viable as a transformational leader is one of the coaches.

Friday, November 1, 2019

Self-Driving Cars Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3750 words

Self-Driving Cars - Research Paper Example From this paper it is clear that in 1939, a General Motors (GM)’s sponsored exhibit, Futurama designed by Norman Bel Geddes, was unveiled at the world Trade Fair. The electromagnetic fields generated by the embedded circuits in the highway provided propulsion while control was radio based. Bel later outlined his mission in a book entitled Magic Motorways in 1940. These developments prompted the improvements in highway design and transportation. In 1923, Radio Corporation America (RCA) labs successfully built a miniature controlled by wires laid on the laboratory floor. It was an experimental system that jerked the imagination of a traffic engineer in Nebraska called Leland Hancock.This study highlights that during the same time, London under United Kingdom’s Transport and Roads Research Lab tested Citron Ds, a driverless car that interacted with magnetic cables embedded in the roads. Citron cruised through a test track at a steady speed of 130 kilometers per hour withou t signs of deviation in any weather condition. In 1980s, Ernst Dickmann and his team of engineers in Bundeswehr University Munich in Germany designed a vision-guided Mercedes Benz robotic van. The van moved at a speed of 63 kilometers per hour on the streets without traffic jam. EUREKA also conducted a multi-million Prometheus Project on autonomous vehicles from 1987 to 1995.  The United States Congress passed the Transportation Automation Bill in 1991 that instructed the United States Department of Transportation to demonstrate self-driving vehicles and highway systems by 1997.